About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
KQED (PBS) 15
CSPAN 13
CSPAN2 11
MSNBCW 9
KRCB (PBS) 7
MSNBC 7
CNNW 6
WETA 6
FBC 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
CNN 3
CNBC 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 116
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)
, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny brought to by the department of education. a report from a nonprofit group last year told the differ
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big the deficit will be but the president has to work with congress. we need more revenue and we need to drive down spending. i think the president understands that and he is working on this but he cannot do this alone. >> looki
it was. education has moved on hugely. i think in terms of the progress to the things we would understand, and there has been a momentum. it has progressed to an extraordinary way. >> the taliban had not gone away. soon afghan security forces will have to fight them on their own. the man who led the intelligence war for most of the last 10 years said the attacks are set to get worse. >> it reduces this. the taliban are going to change their tactics. they are going to modify their strategy. there are going to do more and more spectacular attacks. >> like this one on our first morning in cobble, a triple suicide bombing. officials told us on average there are four such attacks for every week. we went to see what security was like. here the government is offering them money to give up guns and reintegrate themselves into village communities. it is having mixed results. >> the man behind me were told the problem we have is no means of knowing. even if they are, the numbers are so very small. to 6000 integrating. >> the details are registered diametrically. while we were there, at a ballmer ki
population here, they want educated workers to come. but for those who do, it's still back to school. these are spanish engineers with six hours a day of intensive german learning. and it's not just the young. >> you need a lot of time. a lot of effort. and then it's really difficult to learn german. >> difficult even when you can speak some. samuel is an i.t. specialist. he lost his job because of the spanish crisis. now he wakes each day at 4:00 to deliver germany its bread. this isn't the life he imagined. >> after three months if you have to job, you start to run out of money. this is the second step for me. >> there will be many more like him. europe and the unemployment is still rising and the educated jobless will travel wherever they can to build a future. matthew price, "bbc world news," germany. >> 40 years ago today the supreme court reached a landmark decision in the case of row versus wade. it gave women thal constitutional right to abortion but did not achieve consensus. so it's not hard to get an abortion since the court ruling. this report from mississippi. >> anna, h
of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are adults that are looking to get arrested had already been
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
republic has achieved far more progress outcomes in alleviating poverty, health care, providing educational access and expanding opportunities for women in the shah's regime aggregate. hillary and i are happy to go into this morning q&a if you like, let me give you a couple examples of what i'm talking about. the islamic republic has developed a hope your system that is greatly increase and reduce infant and child mentality in iran. the provision of health care to rural areas has been particularly impressive since the revolution. the islamic republic is basically equalized outcomes in urban and rural setting in a knot or which is really quite extraordinary in an international context. get this. there are no iranian doctors and public health specialists working with state university and ngos state of mississippi to introduce iranian styled rural health care delivery into medically underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly expanded educational opportunities with letter series and basically eliminating gender disparity in educational access. one facet of
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
if it is not the guns. >> i think we don't talk enough about the education and economic opportunities that these young people do not have. many of these young people who are involved in these type of activities are locked in two three, four, and five generations of poverty. we're locked in without opportunities often sometimes facing food desert. everything from finding good healthy food to eat, good jobs and educational opportunities and having a life, these things are locked away from these individuals and have been for decades now. i genuinely believe we can cut down on the gun violence in chicago and clang that paradigm. and then from there go after those who are illegally using guns. >> cenk: you know, lenny, i don't think anybody disagrees with you that addressing those issues is a good idea. i think it is. but you heard what profession pollock said there is as much crime in western european cities. they don't have the guns so less people die. in chicago here 500 people killed by guns. in japan on average less than 10 people killed by guns and japan is 125 million people in it. 10 people killed
to create the visa programs for skilled, highly educated workers to establish an agricultural worker program, and then establish a pathway to citizenship for those illegal immigrants who deserve the opportunity in their judgment. well, new york democrat senator chuck schumer calling the bipartisan blueprint a major breakthrough. he claims his fellow democrats are not looking to play politics with this plan. >> we do not want immigration as a wage issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. it is our hope that these principles can be turned into legislation by march and have a markup by chairman leahy with the goal of passage out of the senate by late spring or summer. lou: senator mccain bluntly acknowledged the republican party has been losing support of hispanic voters and says this agreement will change all that. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that in many issues which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, you will find that this agreement has very little difference from th
in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things to. it is his death, the brown v. board of education decision. it was the killing of civil rights for yours. it is people like robert johns, the young high school student who got a walkout on the segregated school because of protesting against the inferior education in 1851. many people we don't even know their names anymore before rosa parks, two other teenagers did the same thing. so this resistant, virtually among young people. >> guest: when we talk about south africa, it was the students in soweto. we all remember nelson mandela, that nelson and all of a sudden he presents no. it is those students who revived, stephen biko another survived a movement in the early 70s family 60s. >> host: is james bevel, talking about children, young people leading the way to contain that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story. >> guest: again come a king was at a crucial point in birmingham. we had this image that king david direction we should march millions of people across the country. that's completely wrong. from a camera
, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the continent. -- that is our presence on the continent. there are 100 personnel who are supporting africans in the effort to joseph kony and his senior lieutenants to justice. they are indicted by the international criminal court. there is a u.s. log that tells us to do that -- u.s. law that tells us to do that. if there is a law that tells us to do that, we go and do that. and it is important part of the consideration. as i mentioned, i have been to or need to of the different countries. -- i have been to 42 other different countrie
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech yesterday was a left wing declaration of war against the movement. and it was opposite. after the r
the reaching out really happens. he wants to and i want to see him really invest in educating our children. that means universal preschool education. that's true for somebody in rural alabama and in detroit. we really need to invest in infrastructure. he talked about that. that's good for all of america to physically be able to compete in the global economy. but there must be a pathway to jobs for those who are too often left behind. we absolutely have to create a pathway to citizenship. we have to go beyond the dream act to really including people so that not only are they able to contribute but the nation is able to benefit. we need to raise the minimum wage. we need to index it to inflation. these are things that aren't just the people who are black and latino. these are all americans. i think this reaching across requires that we see ourselves and the other. if we can see ourselves in the other, we realize that the agenda for those who are too often left behind is an american agenda >> brown: i have to point out that here we are talking about divided washington, right? divided america
to try to educate our youth about the responsibility of using a firearm, the dangers of using a firearm? >> yeah. in a true way, to educate young people about both the responsibility and the true dangers, that's not a bad thing. what is a bad thing is blatantly marketing these guns to young people. basically it exposes the true colors of the gun lobby. they're not concerned in the gun industry. they're not concerned about the prevention of gun violence. they're just concerned about selling more guns. the rest of the american public wants to engage in a meaningful conversation about exactly what you're saying. what we can do respectful of the second amendment right to own guns, respectful of the fact that hunting and target shooting and protection are deeply ingrained notions. and, you know, in a lot of our country. but have that conversation simultaneous to the risks associated with having guns in the home and what we can do to prevent tragedies. >> sure. the tragedy that is most fresh on everyone's mind, newtown. right now there's a hearing under way in connecticut about stopping gun v
individuals who are educated in our universities receiving masters and ph.d.s to be able to stay here. and that's a good thing. too many research facilities are being set up by microsoft in canada or elsewhere rather than doing it here simply because they can't find workers. >> i call it brainiacs, the resolution, and i think it's very important. let me ask you about this, in terms of the house, and probably in terms of the senate too, what about the security? what kind of border security. we've made a lot of investments, what more will be in this bill? >> well, for the first time you have real triggers here. some people concerned about granting citizenship. and let me tell you, the path to citizenship is a long and arduous one. it's not amnesty. amnesty, i think the best definition is cutting in line people who are able to access a path to citizenship won't be able to cut in line. but another step that will need to be taken, there's going to be a commission in this bill comprised of governors and attorneys general and border state community members who have to sign off the certain bo
right after a line about education policy. the girls also used their phones to take lots of photos of their family during the event. at one point, malia even photo bombed her younger sister. >>> before leaving the inaugural platform as the center of attention for the very last time, president obama had the presence of mind to stop and take in the moment. >> i'm not going to see this again. >> all right, senator, great job. >> well done. >> all right, senator, great job. >>> meanwhile, the "today" show's al roker had this unforgettable moment with vice president joe biden while covering the inaugural parade. >> mr. vice president! mr. vice president! mr. vice president! hey, how are you doing? come on -- come on, they won't let you? are you -- yeah, that's it! yeah! all right! yes! yes! >> who can say no to al roker? >> surprised he actually came up -- >> persistence pays off. dylan dreyer is here. good morning. >> good morning. we are actually seeing pretty cold temperatures across the country. want a lot going on across the west coast today, so we're dealing with poor air quality
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my ro
and greet newcomers from france. the education center organizes the internships year. demand is high right now. what's a lot of the french are retracted by the culture of the cheap cost of living, the possibility that you can do everything. click she has been in berlin for 20 years now. she moved for love and state. even so, she still misses france a lot. it's a common topic when she gets together with her french friend. both mess life and in particular, the lightness of the french way of life. >> i miss the feeling you get when you go shopping in the markets in france in the summertime and how easy it is to make contact with people, how easy it is for people to approach. >> during those first few days, i had to change. you have to communicate a bit more subtle way. for instance, had to say "no" in a more pleasant way. cut stealing home in both. hoping the countries will grow even closer. >> i wish there was even more cooperation, more joint projects, meetings, exchanges. anything and everything helping us to expand. >> of course there will still sometimes be some understanding. odds are a
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
by a mob. then, talked about the government we won, which is infrom a structure, education, regulation, then recognize government can't solve all of the problems. i thought that is reaching out, to the tea party right rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the rigging charge this is classic msnbc. going back to 2004 with keith onerman refusing to concede ohio goi
because of my experiences being educated in the west and looking at how western systems did it it was the rule of law. i was surprised by western think tanks and the european ambassadors in our country where they say that is very difficult. you think? i mean, this has been a major challenge and you can't have this by waving a magic wand. it will take hard work so that people start to, for the next elections, vote for candidates because they're on left to right of these particular issues. so, that political party culture, that is the major challenge. and where we're starting from low down in jordan, we're still steps ahead of many countries in the middle east. so, it's going to be tough for all of us. but that's the only way that i think we can do it. >> your majesty, thank you very much. this was a fascinating conversation. >> thank you. >>> that was jordan's king abdullah ii. >>> when we come back, new attacks in algeria have made many talk about the return of al qaeda. but the facts don't quite support the hyperbole. support the hyperbole. i'll explain. [ watch ticking ] [
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
thought here's where i differ. here's where i don't. i thought it was really educational and very provocative. >> ifill: did this president come across a chastened second-termer or an ambitious one in >> he came across different to me. missing from the president was what i had seen several times during the campaign and in the presidency in recent years there was sort of a pet lance. there was a pursed lips look. that was missing. this is a happy warrior. i thought a far more appealing figure in that sense. there seems since the 6th of november to be a sense of resolution about him. he seems more certain or sure-footed than he had been in the past. i can't imagine the president i heard today doing what he did on health care, turning it over to the congress for a year to work its will in the committees and back and forth. i mean this is somebody who is a lot more forceful executive i'd say >> ifill: maybe that's what informed... when he was quoting jefferson and saying that our truths are self-evident but not self-executing >> which is one of the best lines. he was constrained for t
was supposed to just go strictly for education and now, of course, we have learned only half of it, maybe less will go toward education. shep. >> shepard: he could move, i suppose. and there is a welcome mat out for him. >> oh, yeah. the texas governor rick perry from no tax, texas has said he would put the welcome mat out in a tweet i'm quoting here hey phil, texas is home to liberty and low taxes. we would love to have you as well. phil's long time rival on the golf course tiger woods also a california native. tiger says the reason he left california back in 1996 is because of taxes. a move that saved him well over $100 million. the experts say even the rich are keeping track. listen. >> we're under the impression if a person has 10 they won't miss three. if that person is earning that money, i assure you they will miss every single dime. >> others have a different view. syracuse professor wrote and i'm quoting please stop whining and give thanks for being able to earn a fabulous living playing a game and selling golf clubs even after tax 99 pulp the 99% of people would never have that optio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)